Pont-rhyd-y-groes waterfall walk

Including Nant y Berws Falls and Grogwynion Falls, and the Coed Maenarthur forest.

Ability requirements (key)


From Cardiff, take the A470 to the Llangurig roundabout. From Llangurig, take the first turnoff (left) at the roundabout, onto the A44 towards Aberystwyth. At Ponterwyd, turn left on the A4120 towards Devil's Bridge. From Devil's Bridge, turn left onto the B4343 towards Pontrhydygroes (the spelling used on the sign). After crossing the bridge in Pont-rhyd-y-groes, take the first right. Park near the water wheel. SN 7383 7224.


This route is heavily inspired by a route created by Des Marshall and published in his book Walking to Mid Wales' Waterfalls (see that book for more details). His route takes in some good views and is a nicely complete and enjoyable route taking in the entire forest. It deserves recognition. This description covers the same basic route, but adding an extra waterfall, and taking account of various changes that had been made to the forestry tracks in 2010. The waterfalls are best viewed in high flow, when the trees have lost their leaves.

Take the path down to the river that starts directly opposite the water wheel, to arrive at the Miners Bridge, a narrow footbridge crossing the river Ystwyth's deep gorge. To the left is an unnamed waterfall spilling down the side of the gorge. On the far side of the bridge, take the path to the left to reach a forestry track. Turn left along the forestry track. A short distance along it, the Nant y Berws stream plunges over the far side of the gorge, creating the Nant y Berws Falls. You may need to make your way down through the forest with care to the edge of the gorge to see the waterfall.

After 400 metres on the track, a well-defined path with a marker post leads off on the left, zigzagging down to the gorge. Once at the gorge, head downstream, past several rapids in the river. Eventually, the path climbs back up to the forestry track. Turn left. Immediately take another path heading back down to the left, which descends to the remains of a part stone, part log dam. Just upstream, another small waterfall enters on the far bank, but it may be impossible to see through the leaves in summer.

Turn right at the top of the dam, to head downstream. The path soon begins a steady climb up to the forestry track again. At the track, turn right then left onto a stepped path. When this reaches an overgrown upper track, turn right then left again onto another stepped path. The steps stop for a while. Just after the steps restart, a little path on the left reaches the base of Grogwynion Falls. Back on the stepped path, continue up the steps for a long way, turning left at a junction, right at a grassy fork, and then bending around to the right (where an overgrown path leaves on the left). Follow the track for over 500 metres (another track keeps joining and leaving on the left side - try to ignore it), then reaches to a stile on the left. Cross it and follow the path until it turns a hairpin bend to the right at a marker post, then reaches a stile some distance below the first one.

Cross the stile and continue ahead, crossing a track, and then descending through the forest to a junction with a marker post. Turn sharp left, and follow the level path which later descends to another marker post. Turn left and follow the path to a cottage. Turn right onto the forestry track. Take the path that peels off on the left at a marker post, and descend back to the Miners Bridge.


KML files can be opened in Google Earth, Google Maps, GPX Viewer, and some other mapping services.


More about this area

Whilst every care has been taken in the compilation of this description, neither the author nor his fellow walkers can accept responsibility for loss or injury arising from any errors, omissions or inaccuracies in this description. This description is intended as a guide only, and you should select a route to suit your own abilities, at your own discretion. Ability requirements are a guide only. Route maps are approximated. You follow this description at your own risk.